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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
immigration system it cannot be what it is destined to be. >> a few days after the election when the republicans looked at the figures from the president how mitt romney had done with hispanic voters, there was like a 44-point gap. they said we need to do something aggressive on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans couldn't agree on what needs to be done, the fervor seemed to have already cooled. how do you get your own party on the same page, let alone bring on democrats? >> i disagree. i don't think that's what is happening. what is happening, the concept of immigration reform, there is a lot of consensus. the details of immigration reform need to be examined. i'll give you an example. we have millions of people waiting to come here legally and they come to my office and say we have done it the right way, waited, paid the fees, but you are telling me if i came here illegally it would have been faster? it didn't seem right. that is the kind of debate we are going to have. on the ag worker-guest worker, there are labor unions that are not in favor of a guest wor
got elected on this time and what was most present in the populous mind is he needs to stay strong on what he was elected on and what he said he was going to do. host: this is from the facebook page. the question is, what do you think the president pose a number one priority should be. brian is joining us from texas on the republican line. caller: good morning. i am down here in texas and we voted the other way. the number one thing i see is jobs. you have economic growth, you have money to in the system moving. getting to the people that need it, not the people sitting in washington, d.c. i was just listening to what mr. obama was hanged and all of the things he promised in 2008, and now with a new election, and demanded, raising taxes and $1.60 trillion in texas. how is that going to help anybody? people do not have the money now. where are we going to get it? coming from the government, everybody thinks that are entitled to something. thank you for the call. the top solution is to break the congressional gridlock. north dakota on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the nu
? >> well, piers, as you know, there were a number of efforts before the election to get this done and there were major differences between the parties, and those parties became a big part of the conversation during the presidential debate. the president could not have been clearer that he wanted to do two things. he wanted to boost economic growth by doing things like investing in our infrastructure which used to be a bipartisan idea, but also, extending middle class tax cuts and as you said, asking the wealthiest to pay a little bit more to reduce the deficit. that was part of the conversation. so we would hope that the election would break a little bit of this logjam. obviously that hasn't happened yet. the president's put his plan on the table. i'm still very hopeful, piers, that we'll get there. i agree with you, it would be better to get there sooner rather than later. time is running out. no doubt about it. >> one of the big problems it seems to me is the relationship between john boehner and barack obama. just seems deeply flawed. they're at a party and they couldn't be bot
would note that the president was in cam cambodia after the election, and then he was in burma, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)